Old favorite sweaters to wear, new patterns to hand knit
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Oldies but Goodies

Oldies but Goodies

I began my knitting career designing sweaters and selling under the label Sue P. Knits.  I design the sweaters, write the pattern and knit the sample sweater up on a knitting machine.. Then the sweater line goes to a trade show. The next step is moving it into production. And, lastly, to a boutique where it waits  to move to someone’s closet and hopefully become their favorite sweater.  Every once in awhile someone asks me if I have the pattern for a sweater.  This question always stumped me.  Of course I have the pattern but the patterns are written for the knitting machine, not a hand knitter. And, I wanted to sell the sweater, not the pattern.  Furthermore, rewriting the patterns felt like so much work.  After all, when I write a pattern for a knitting machine, it’s basically just measurements.  Writing actual instructions can be quite laborious. But, I was asked so much that I thought I’d give it a go. Then a funny thing happened.  I found out that I really enjoyed writing actual instructions for hand knitters. So, when I got more involved in Ravelry, I decided to write a few patterns based on sweaters that were in my sweater line.  Naturally, I chose favorite sweaters that were fairly straightforward. I then published them under my sweater label name, Sue P. Knits on Ravelry.  Well, as time went on and I started up Olio Knits, where the sole purpose is hand knit patterns, I decided to combine all my pattern writing efforts under one label.  It just seems more efficient. So, here is the most recent result of that merge.  The Pleated and Pocketed Cardigan and the Pebbled Cardigan.

knit cardigans

 

Both cardigans have similar shapes, boxy and cropped.  The pattern tells you where you can add length to either sweater, if you like.  The pleated cardigan has just that- pleats.  I love how the pleats add texture and interest to the sweater.  Same with the Pebbled cardigan.  On the top, texture is achieved by simply using reverse stockinette stitch.  The bottom is just regular stockinette stitch.  Pockets are a must for either sweater. The simplest of buttonholes were used for the closures and both feature a roll hem.

rolled hem

The Rolled hem is featured on both pieces and pictured above on the Pebbled Cardigan.  The Pebbled Cardigan is made from Balance by O Wool.  The yarn is 50% Organic Cotton and 50% Organic Wool which is a great combination. The color choices are numerous and it should be noted that many colors are dyed with low impact dyes.  Below is a close up of the pleating on the Pleated and Pocketed Cardigan.  This cardigan uses Berroco’s Ultra Alpaca.  I really like this yarn because I love tweed and Berroco does tweed well.

old favorite sweaters

Last, but not least here is a video that show you how to pleat.  They are really quite simple.  Don’t be intimidated!

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